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principles of Style: #286

There are a few things you can always buy without trying them on first…under-shirts, under-wear, ties, and socks…for everything else…you should head for the fitting room…and make sure it fits you right…not too baggy and not too tight…tmoS #286

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things i Love:

Cashmere Lined Lambskin Leather Gloves

When old man winter rolls in…you really can’t go wrong with a pair of these classic gloves…they are not the kind of gloves to go skiing with…and that is the point…big ski gloves are for the slopes…or if you find yourself in Fargo, ND in February…for a man of Style, a pair of leather gloves like these, are a perfect complement to all of your tailored outerwear…refined enough for your commute to work…and classic enough for when you find yourself out on the weekends…you can find them in many different colors…I love them in brown…at many different price points…and by many different brands…that’s why it is one of the things i Love…tmoS

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principles of Style: #378

a style History: Cuff Links…The forerunner of today’s shirt first appeared in the early-16th century…its ruffled wristband finished with small openings on either side that tied together with “cuff strings”…although cuff strings would remain popular well into the nineteenth century…it was during the reign of Louis XIV that shirt sleeves started to be fastened with sleeve buttons…these were typically identical pairs of colored glass buttons joined together by a short, linked chain…by 1715, simple, paste-glass buttons had given way to pairs of two, decoratively painted or jeweled studs…they were typically diamonds, connected by ornate gold links…hence the birth of the “cuff link”…today they come in all materials, shapes, sizes and designs…I am partial to wearing vintage ones…tmoS #378

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principles of Style: 1899

The following is one of seventeen “Don’ts for Men” that were originally published in 1899…”Don’t carry a silk umbrella at the middle. Use the handle always”…and I follow that advice to this day…tmoS #115

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principles of Style: grooming

Always remember to eat a healthy balanced diet…and to exercise regularly…skip the fast food…and eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables…so how is this a grooming tip you ask…well, not only will you feel better and have more energy…but it will improve the look of your skin and your hair…tmoS #250

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principles of Style: #446

Layering your clothing is a learned skill…it requires an ability to combine colors, patterns, and fabric textures…the key to doing this right is to build an interchangeable wardrobe…select core clothing pieces that work with each other in various combinations…for various occasions and seasons…take the principles of Style that you have learned, and apply them…don’t be afraid…use the force Luke…tmoS #446

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principles of Style: #306

Elbow patches on a sportcoat aren’t reserved for just english literature professors on leafy college campuses…and no, it doesn’t make you look nerdy…they derive from the shooting jackets of traditional gentleman’s hunting attire…so anything you originally wore while holding a shotgun is OK in my book…tmoS #306

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principles of Style: #132

The signs of a very well made…Necktie…there are four ways to check the quality of a necktie…First, the fabric that forms the exterior (or envelope) should be cut at a 45-degree angle…this way the weave will run diagonally to your breast bone…good neckwear should hang completely straight and not twist this way or that…if it does this, it has not been properly cut…Second, check the tie’s elasticity by gently tugging one end while holding the other…any good tie will return to its original length almost instantly when you let go…Third, look under the back of the envelope for a slip stitch…this is a sewn in, loose loop of thread that hangs down and allows the tie to be knotted without being damaged…Fourth, the tie’s lining should not move when pulled…and should completely cover the interlining (the wool-blend piece sewn into the envelope that gives the tie structure)…a really quality tie will be lined in the same fabric as the envelope…today, men wear ties less and less…so why bother with cheaply made neckwear…tmoS #132

Quote
"The only time a man can be overdressed is when he is taking a shower."

the messenger of Style

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principles of Style: throw back

…from the archives…tmoS

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man of Style:

Today we highlight a man that exemplifies classic style…a true man of Style…american actor…Paul Newman…a screen icon and philanthropist ….tmoS

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principles of Style: #208

Remember…it’s not about going out and spending a ton of money trying to replicate the latest ads from a magazine…it’s about wearing classic, well-fitting clothes that you feel good in…clothes that fits your personality, lifestyle, and are appropriate for the occasion…a true man of style doesn’t look like a fashion victim…nor does he stick out like a sore thumb…he flies under the radar, yet has a personal style that sets him apart…whether you like to dress up and wear suits and sport-coats…go casual with chinos and a polo…or are laid back with jeans and a tee-shirt…just spend a little time…follow the simple rules that have been laid out…and you will look good…tmoS #208

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principles of Style: #461

A classic rugby shirt is one of the manliest things a guy can wear…unless you play in the NFL…in that case, your uniform is the manliest thing a guy can wear…since most of you reading this probably don’t play professional football…you will need to go out and buy some rugby shirts…tmoS #461

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principles of Style: #487

So when was the as time you shined your shoes, or had them shined?…what’s that?…the last time your shoes had a shine on them was when they were new…OK…would you walk around with un-combed hair?…un-shaven face?…un-brushed teeth?…un-ironed shirt?…didn’t think so…now go get your shoes shined…tmoS #487

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principles of Style: 1899

The following is one of seventeen “Don’ts for Men” that were originally published in 1899…”Don’t confound a very tight glove with a well fitting glove”…and I follow that advice to this day…tmoS #114