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principles of Style: #563

Some call them trousers…some call them pants…if you are a tailor, in the clothing business, or a fancy man, you call them trousers…everybody else may call them pants…now if you want to be really old school…you can call them slacks…tmoS #563

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principles of Style: #177

While we seem to be on the topic of suede and stains…remember that suede shoe care is in a category of its own…since you cannot simply polish away any stain or scuff marks…you will have to use a suede eraser…basically a brick of crumbly rubber…then use a suede brush to restore the nap of the leather…all done…now let’s all agree to stop spilling things on ourselves for the rest of the month…tmoS #177

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principles of Style: food&drink

At some point you are going to end up with some food or drink on you…when this happens…you want to make sure to act quickly…before the stain sets…remember to blot and not rub…rubbing removes dyes…damages fibers…and will actually spread the stain…so again, you blot…then take it to a dry cleaner when you get home…tmoS #162

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principles of Style: #472

We talked about the difference between a wingtip and a brogue (there isn’t…they are the same shoe)…so what about those ankle-high suede shoes?…which ones are chukkas and which are desert boots?…though often used synonymously, they are subtly different…the desert boot has a two-hole lace upper and sits on a crepe sole…a chukka has a three-hole lace upper and sits on a leather or rubber sole…I told you the difference was subtle…you can also just refer to the pictures below…tmoS #472

Desert Boot

Chukka Boot

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principles of Style: #504

The difference between your chest size and waist size is known as the Drop…so if you are a size 42 chest, and a size 36 waist, then you are a 6” Drop…knowing your Drop will help you determine the appropriate nested suit for your build…thus a standard cut suit, has a 6” Drop…an athletic cut suit has an 8” Drop…a gentleman’s cut (big&tall) suit has a 4” Drop…if you are buying suit separates, then the Drop doesn’t matter…as you are purchasing the suit and trousers separately, and are able to mix the sizes to your needs…it is all about buying the jacket in your correct size…as the jacket is more difficult to alter than the trousers…however, if you have to take in or let out the trousers more than 2”…then go with suit separates…unless, of course, you go out and get a made-to-measure suit…now that would be a man of Style move…tmoS #504

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principles of Style: throw back

…from the archives…tmoS

Quote
"Good clothes open all doors."

Thomas Fuller

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principles of Style: #165

There are some instances where quantity over quality is OK…socks and underwear are a good example…suits are not…one good suit is better than two cheap suits…and a burlap sack is better than anything you will ever find at Jos. A. Bank…tmoS #165

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man of Style:

Today we highlight a man that exemplifies classic style…a true man of Style…english actor and film legend…Cary Grant…the most dapper movie star ever….tmoS

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principles of Style: #467

Let’s talk corduroy…corduroy is offered in varying thickness of ridges or ribs…their thickness, referred as wale, can determine how it should be worn…twenty one ribs to an inch is known as a fine wale; great for shirts…sixteen ribs to an inch is known as pinwale; great for suits or sport coats…eight ribs to an inch is known as a wide wale; great for casual pants…anything below eight ribs is known as a broadwale; great for outerwear…the lower the wale, the more chunky the fabric gets…and the more noise it makes when it rubs together as you move…so a broad wale should be worn sparingly…tmoS #467

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principles of Style: #266

One of the best casual outerwear options is the down vest…perfect for when it’s not too cold out…but cold enough…they are meant to look utilitarian…so you don’t need any more pockets than two…one for each hand…get it…tmoS #266

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principles of Style: #553

So you need a new pair of dress shoes…should you buy a pair of brogues or wingtips?…tough decision?…not really…they are the same thing…europeans and fancy men call them brogues…we in america call them wingtips…because these shoes are characterized by a pointed toe cap with extensions that run along both sides of the toe, and terminate near the ball of the foot…viewed from the top, this toe cap style is shaped like a “W” and looks similar to a bird with extended wings…thus wingtips…this is a shoe that can easily dress up when paired with a suit;shiny and new…or dress down when paired with jeans;burnished and well worn…although I wouldn’t pair them with khakis…leather or suede…in any color…you can’t go wrong with a pair of these in your closet…tmoS #533

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principles of Style: #286

There are a few things you can always buy without trying them on first…under-shirts, under-wear, ties, and socks…for everything else…you should head for the fitting room…and make sure it fits you right…not too baggy and not too tight…tmoS #286

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things i Love:

Cashmere Lined Lambskin Leather Gloves

When old man winter rolls in…you really can’t go wrong with a pair of these classic gloves…they are not the kind of gloves to go skiing with…and that is the point…big ski gloves are for the slopes…or if you find yourself in Fargo, ND in February…for a man of Style, a pair of leather gloves like these, are a perfect complement to all of your tailored outerwear…refined enough for your commute to work…and classic enough for when you find yourself out on the weekends…you can find them in many different colors…I love them in brown…at many different price points…and by many different brands…that’s why it is one of the things i Love…tmoS

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principles of Style: #378

a style History: Cuff Links…The forerunner of today’s shirt first appeared in the early-16th century…its ruffled wristband finished with small openings on either side that tied together with “cuff strings”…although cuff strings would remain popular well into the nineteenth century…it was during the reign of Louis XIV that shirt sleeves started to be fastened with sleeve buttons…these were typically identical pairs of colored glass buttons joined together by a short, linked chain…by 1715, simple, paste-glass buttons had given way to pairs of two, decoratively painted or jeweled studs…they were typically diamonds, connected by ornate gold links…hence the birth of the “cuff link”…today they come in all materials, shapes, sizes and designs…I am partial to wearing vintage ones…tmoS #378